Mother Green Sea Turtle Visits Scandi Divers in Big La Laguna Beach

August 11, 2013 -- a mother green sea turtle came ashore and laid 135 of her eggs next to Scandi Divers front steps in Big La Laguna Beach, Puerto Galera. The eggs will hatch after about two months, when the baby turtles will dig themselves out and return to the sea.

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Green Sea Turtle in La Laguna Beach - Text and Photo courtesy by Scandi Divers


We undertook to transfer the eggs to a higher area down the beach at Cataquis Lodge, away from the danger of storm waves. The green sea turtle is an endangered species so we will closely monitor the hatching to ensure all the baby turtles make it safely to the ocean.

Green turtles almost always nest on the same beach used by their mothers, so we wish them all the best and hope to see this family of turtles returning for years to come.

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135 eggs of an endangered Green Sea Turtle - Text and Photo courtesy by Scandi Divers

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FACTS ABOUT SEA TURTLES
Text from
Sea Turtle Conservancy

Sea turtles are generally solitary creatures that remain submerged for much of the time they are at sea, which makes them extremely difficult to study. They rarely interact with one another outside of courtship and mating. Ridleys, however, do come together in massive groups during nesting. But even when large numbers of turtles gather on feeding grounds or during migration, there is little behavioral exchange among individuals. Because of the difficulty in studying marine turtles in the open ocean, there are a great many things still unknown about their behavior. Decades of research, however, including observations at sea, have produced useful insights into daily activities and behaviors such as courtship, mating and nesting.

Beach Selection
Most females return faithfully to the same beach each time they are ready to nest. Not only do they appear on the same beach, they often emerge within a few hundred yards of where they last nested.

Nesting Behavior
Only the females nest, and it occurs most often at night. The female crawls out of the ocean, pausing frequently as if carefully scoping out her spot. Sometimes she will crawl out of the ocean, but for unknown reasons decide not to nest. This is a "false crawl," and it can happen naturally or be caused by artificial lighting or the presence of people on the beach. Most females nest at least twice during the nesting season, although individuals of some species may nest only once and others more than ten times. Sea turtles are generally slow and awkward on land, and nesting is exhausting work.

Constructing the Nest
The female turtle crawls to a dry part of the beach and begins to fling away loose sand with her flippers. She then constructs a "body pit" by digging with her flippers and rotating her body. After the body pit is complete, she digs an egg cavity using her cupped rear flippers as shovels. The egg cavity is shaped roughly like a tear drop and is usually tilted slightly.